WHAT'S NEW - 2017
  • We regretfully announce the passing of former Inglewood PD Chief of Police Chief Raymond Johnson, August 1, 2017 (Click here)
  • SUMMER MIXER - August 10 / 6pm - 10pm / The Black Peace Officers Assoc. / LA County (Click Here)
  • Danielle Outlaw Deputy Chief of the Oakland PD named new Portland, Ore Police Chief (Click here)
  • New Dallas, Texas Police Chief Ulysha Renee Hall from Detroit, Michigan (Click Here)
  • Gina Hawkins, Deputy Chief of the Clayton County, Georgia, Police Department, was announced Tuesday as Fayetteville’s Police Chief (See Below)
  • On Monday July 3, Pasadena native and John Muir alum Richard Bell will be sworn in as the first African-American Chief of Police for the City of West Covina. (Click here)
  • Retired LAPD Lieutenant and SCC NOBLE Member on Dr. Phil this week. He will also have a workshop on Human Trafficking at NOBLE National Conference in Atlanta! (See Below)
  • 41st Annual Training Conference and Exhibition (See Below)
  • Veteran Police Chief Kenton W. Rainey has been named the new chief of police for the University of Chicago Police Department, effective July 1. (Click Below)

We regretfully announce the passing of former Inglewood PD Chief of Police Chief Raymond Johnson, August 1, 2017

Chief Ray Johnson died at the age of 81 on August 1, 2017 in Sacramento, California of complications from Leukemia. Ray is survived by his wife Patricia, daughter Ava Palmer (Terry), grandson Terrell Palmer, granddaughter Kyana Palmer, stepson Michael Hogan, grandson Christopher Hernandez, four siblings, and numerous nieces, nephews and cousins. Ray served in the United State Marine Corps from 1953 to 1957. He graduated from CSU Sacramento, earning his BA in Vocational Education in 1975. Ray joined the Bakersfield Police Department in 1959, serving as a police officer before joining the California Highway Patrol in 1965. During his 21 years of service, he was promoted from traffic officer to first ever African American Sergeant to first Deputy Chief ending his CHP career as Division Commander of the Southern Division. He was appointed Chief of Police for Inglewood, California in 1986 where he served until 1991 when Governor Pete Wilson appointed him Executive Director of the Governor's Office of Criminal Justice Planning (OCJP). He was a member of the Governor's Policy Council on Drug and Alcohol Abuse, chaired the California Council on Criminal Justice Committee and the Southwest Border States Coalition. Governor Wilson appointed Ray as a member of the Youthful Offender Parole Board in 1998 where he served until he retired in June 2006. In lieu of flowers, the family requests donations be made to the California Highway Patrol 9-11 Scholarship Program.  Memorial Services are scheduled for August 25, 2017 at 10:00 a.m. at Bayside Church, 8191 Sierra College Blvd., Roseville, California.



DANIELLE OUTLAW DEPUTY CHIEF OF OAKLAND PD NAMED NEW PORTLAND POLICE CHIEF

PORTLAND, Ore. — Danielle Outlaw of the Oakland Police Department has been named the new Portland Police chief.

Mayor Ted Wheeler announced Outlaw has been selected for the position. She has spent 19 years with the Oakland Police Department, most recently as deputy police chief since 2013.

“My life’s passion is policing. I want to make a positive difference in the lives of my fellow officers and the residents of the community,” said Outlaw. “Portland is an amazing city. I am humbled by the tremendous opportunity in front of me, and am ready to get to work.”

Outlaw will begin her new job no later than Oct. 2. She'll become the city's first female African American chief.

VIDEO (Click here)


Detroit Deputy Chief Ulysha Renee Hall who'll be the first female to serve as police chief in Dallas, TX
DALLAS - The Dallas Police Department has a new police chief.

City Manager T.C. Broadnax has hired Detroit Deputy Chief Ulysha Renee Hall, who'll be the first female to serve as police chief in Dallas.

In her new leadership role with Dallas police, Hall said she hopes to continue her work building a bridge between the community and police. "The most important thing that we need to know is that it takes the entire city to police any city," she said Wednesday during a news conference out of Detroit. "Whether that is Detroit of Dallas, we need everybody, all hands on deck, everybody working together."

During her time with the Detroit Police Department, Hall established and oversaw a neighborhood policing program that worked to create a relationship between minority communities and officers. According to a city of Dallas statement, Detroit saw a 40-year low in homicides and "double-digit reductions in violent crime for three consecutive years" at a time she served with the department.

Hall's father, Officer Ulysses Brown, was killed in the line of duty on Aug. 20, 1971 in Detroit. She was just six months old at the time, according to Detroit's ABC station, WXYZ. Brown was working for a unit formed to crackdown on prostitution when he was shot dead by an unknown assailant, the Detroit station reported. "My father not being there meant the same thing as every other child in Detroit or around the world growing up without a father," she told WXYZ. "It has an impact." Almost 26 years later, her father's murder remains one of Detroit's oldest unsolved cases.
At the age of 29, she began her service with the Detroit Police Department.

When asked about advice for other women in law enforcement, Hall said "anything is possible."
"What I need women to know is we kind of do it a little different, a little better, a little more nurturing by nature," she said. "We add that little something special to law enforcement that truly, truly calms the savage beast ... Any young lady interested in law enforcement, go after your dreams, follow your heart and one day you too can stand as a chief of police in a major city."

From Dallas, Broadnax also addressed the historic aspect of Hall's hiring. "I think it speaks volumes to where this city is," he said of the first female police chief. "I think it speaks volumes to her police and law enforcement background. And I think it should be significant." There were eight finalists to replace former Chief David Brown. One of the finalists, Chief Steve Dye, of Grand Prairie, dropped out. The list included Dallas Deputy Chiefs Malik Aziz and Rick Watson,d Dallas Assistant Chief Gary Tittle, Seattle Deputy Chief Carmen Best, Detroit Deputy Chief U. Renee Hall, Los Angeles First Assistant Chief Michel Moore and Assistant Chief Luther Reynolds, of Montgomery County, MD.

The city launched a nationwide search after Brown retired in October. The candidates toured the city last week and met with citizens, police associations and the Dallas City Council. Broadnax listened to people’s viewpoints but the decision was his to make.
The new chief faces big challenges, including low morale, failing pensions and a dwindling police department. Broadnax went to the council to ask for a higher salary to pay the new chief. Hall will start her role as Dallas police chief on September 5.

Gina Hawkins, Deputy Chief of the Clayton County, Georgia, Police Department, was announced Tuesday as Fayetteville’s Police Chief.

Gina Hawkins, deputy chief of the Clayton County, Georgia, Police Department, was announced Tuesday as Fayetteville’s police chief.

Hawkins, who will start Aug. 14, will become the first woman and first minority to serve in the permanent position of police chief for Fayetteville. She said in a statement released by the city that she is thrilled and looks forward to “hitting the ground running” soon.

“Being able to serve as the police chief for the City of Fayetteville is a tremendous honor, and I will be fulfilling one of my long-term career goals,” she said. “The Police Department is best in class and values community policing while they are engaged with problem solving.”

City Manager Doug Hewett made the announcement in the City Hall council chambers, culminating a search that began in February to replace Chief Harold Medlock. Medlock announced his intention to retire in September and took a medical leave of absence that started in October and carried through his last day in December.

Hewett said he was impressed with Hawkins’ ability to listen and understand the needs of the community, her attention to detail, and her ability to adapt and evolve. He said he also liked her sense of humor while working in a serious, demanding profession and her ability to connect with people.

Hawkins said in a telephone interview that her leadership style includes engaging and listening.

“I try to pull the best out of everyone,” she said.

Hawkins has developed a reputation as a no-nonsense cop during her 28 years in law enforcement. She said she sees that as holding people accountable, upholding standards and keeping things on track.

“I know the Fayetteville Police Department is doing that,” she said. “I don’t see 'no-nonsense' as a problem.”

Hawkins said she would have to wait to determine the challenges she faces, but said she’s not afraid to deal with them. She said crime is always an issue, even when it goes down.

“We’re always going to be trying to decrease crime,” she said. “We’re never going to get complacent.”

Hawkins has served in the state of Georgia for her entire career. She was born in Columbus, Ohio, and attended N.C. Central University in Durham for two years before starting her career in 1988 with the Atlanta Police Department.

She has a bachelor's degree in criminal justice from Georgia State University and a master's in management from Johns Hopkins University. She graduated the FBI National Academy and the Senior Management Insititute for Police at Boston University.

As a deputy chief with the Clayton County police force, she has overseen the field operations and support services commands for the county of roughly 278,000 people.

Hawkins will make $140,000 as Fayetteville’s police chief. She will manage 433 sworn and 187 non-sworn employees and a $53.9 million budget.

Two other candidates were in the running for the job, including Anthony Kelly, who has been interim chief since Medlock’s retirement. The other was James Hinson Jr., a deputy chief in the Greensboro Police Department.

Hewett said Kelly has pledged his “100 percent” support to make Hawkins’ tenure a success. Hewett said he holds Kelly in high regard and praised the interim chief for how he has led the department.

“I really felt that Chief Hawkins’ experience, skills and abilities are what we need to move us even further,” he said.

Hawkins said in the statement that she looks forward to working with Kelly. She said he has done an excellent job as interim chief and that she expects to learn many great things from him.

“Fayetteville is a great city heading in the right direction, and I am excited to serve and work with its residents,” she said.

In the interview, Hawkins said she sees Kelly’s service to the department as a bonus.

“He’s still the assistant chief,” she said. “He’s still part of the community.”

Hawkins said she and Kelly are friends. She said she doesn’t see the support he has as a problem.

“They just need to get to know me,” she said.

Hawkins said she is proud to be first minority to serve as Fayetteville’s police chief. Her father, who served in the Air Force and was a Golden Gloves boxer, was black. Her mother is Panamanian.

Hawkins said she realizes that she is representing a lot of female law enforcement officers.

“I don’t want to let them down, but I also won’t let down my brothers,” she said.

Hawkins said she doesn’t want to diminish the significance of being the first female, but also doesn’t to overemphasize the issue.

“Remember, I’ve been a female all my life,” she said. “I’ve worked hard.”

Steve DeVane Staff writer @WriterDeVane


PASADENA'S RICHARD BELL TO BE SWORN IN AS WEST COVINA PD CHIEF
On Monday July 3, Pasadena native and John Muir alum Richard Bell will be sworn in as the first African-American Chief of Police for the City of West Covina.

An outstanding athlete, Richard played football at John Muir and was All-Pacific League and All-Southern Section quarterback and he went on to play slot back at the University of Nebraska. He was drafted by the Pittsburgh Steelers in the 12th round and played a season with them. He went to the Kansas City Chiefs as a free agent the next season and was released during training camp. The next year he went to Spain to play for the Barcalona Dragons but was severely injured and his career came to an end.

A law enforcer for over twenty years, Richard has been breaking down barriers his whole life. When he first African-American male hired in the City of San Marino in the '90s. Richard told the Pasadena Black Pages that when he got to San Marino he didn't know he was the first Black male to work there, simply because the city is so close to Pasadena and Pasadena is such a diverse community. He had no idea that things were so different right down the street.

Richard followed the chief from San Marino to West Covina and he has been there ever since.
West Covina just got a good man to run things, even if its just for a little while. Still young by police standards, Richard will be sworn in Monday as the interim chief and the buck will stop with him, but the city is currently looking for a permanent replacement. So even though the intern label will be off and Richard will wear the stripes of the chief, he feels like he will be the chief somewhere someday.

We could use a local guy who really understands the community here in Pasadena. it's a beautiful thing the see progression in a city like West Covina, but it brings us back to the lack of progression here in Pasadena, a very diverse city that hasn't had an African-American police chief since James M. Robenson in the 80s.

West Covina has Richard Bell now, but if they don't want to keep him, we think he would be the best Chief of Police Pasadena could ever have. Things have to change and Richard Bell could straighten out a lot of things here in Pasadena.



Retired LAPD Lieutenant and SCC NOBLE Member on Dr. Phil this week. He will also have a workshop on Human Trafficking at NOBLE National Conference in Atlanta!   Click Here



Police Chief Kenton W. Rainey
Veteran Police Chief Kenton W. Rainey has been named the new chief of police for the University of Chicago Police Department, effective July 1.

As chief, Rainey will oversee the approximately 100 members of the full-service, professionally accredited police department and serve as the department’s representative on campus and in the neighboring communities. Rainey also will direct the UCPD’s policing initiatives, develop innovative crime prevention strategies and implement effective community policing programs.

Rainey will report to Eric M. Heath, associate vice president for the University’s Department of Safety & Security.

“One of the many valuable areas of expertise Kenton brings to the University of Chicago is his involvement with creating innovative, community-based policing strategies,” said Heath. “Throughout his law enforcement career, Kenton has worked in diverse communities, where he built strong and positive relationships with community members and successfully implemented new policing programs, resulting in effective policing efforts.”

Most recently Rainey served as the chief of police for the San Francisco Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) Police Department until his retirement from the role at the end of last year. Rainey also has served as chief of police for the Fairfield, Calif. Police Department and commander of the airport police for the San Antonio Police Department, in addition to leadership roles with several other law enforcement agencies in California and Ohio.

"The University of Chicago is a world-class organization, and it is an honor and privilege for me to have been selected for this position,” said Rainey. “I’m excited to work with the members of the University’s police department, the University’s students, faculty and staff, and area community members so that together we can achieve our public safety mission.”

Rainey, who is originally from Chicago, is a graduate of California State University, Long Beach with a bachelor’s degree in criminal justice and the University of Phoenix with a master’s degree in organizational management.